“The Five Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace” by Gary Chapman and Paul White ~ Wednesday’s Book of the Week

This week’s book of the week is “The Five Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace” by Gary Chapman and Paul White. A couple of years ago I read “The Five Love Languages” by Gary Chapman which talks about the way in which people give and interpret love. If someone expresses love for another in say writing, but the person on the receiving end has a primary love language of acts of service then the expression can fall on deaf ears. At the very most it will have less meaning than if that expression was in the receivers primary love language. By the same token of giving and receiving love, the way we give appreciation can be missing the mark if we don’t understand that there are multiple ways of giving and receiving appreciation.

We all know that appreciation is important. But did you know that, “the number one factor in job satisfaction is not the amount of pay we receive but whether or not we feel appreciated and valued for the work we do”¹? Appreciation goes a long way. But not only is it necessary to show appreciation, but to show it in the right way. As the authors Gary Chapman and Paul White go on to point out, “A national study by the Canadian government concluded: ‘No matter which type of recognition program organizations have in place, if employees are not being recognized in a way that is valued by them, the recognition is less meaningful.'”²

Beautiful NYC Skyline, Sunset
Photo Credits: Juergen Roth. Used by Permission.

Another way that this can be seen is in how managers view they are doing in areas of appreciation, versus how employees view how those managers show appreciation. “In a national Globoforce employee recognition survey across multiple companies, 51% of managers say they do a good job of showing recognition for a job well done. But only 17% of the employees who work for those managers say the manager shows recognition for work well done.”³ This means there is a total disconnect between the appreciation being shown and the appreciation being received at most organizations.

The Five Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace states, “We have found that each person has a primary and secondary language of appreciation. Our primary language communicates more deeply to us than the others. Although we will accept appreciation in all five languages, we will not feel truly valued unless the message is communicated through our primary language.”

If you really want a team that works with you enthusiastically and not just because they “have to show up” then showing them appreciation in the language that they speak is vital. This week we’ll talk more in-depth about the five languages of appreciation and how you can multiply your efforts so that this becomes part of the culture at your work and not just another task.

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Sarah Jackson

Vigilant Poster Girl

Every week I talk about a book that we’re reading on leadership and self-development. You can follow along by going to the Book of the Week page at the top. And order a book (either kindle, audible, or paperback) by clicking on the photo of that book. When you do that, it also helps fund this site. 

References

  1. Chapman, Gary. The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace (p. 11). Moody Publishers. Kindle Edition.
  2. Chapman, Gary. The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace (p. 39). Moody Publishers. Kindle Edition.
  3. Chapman, Gary. The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace (p. 38). Moody Publishers. Kindle Edition.
  4. Chapman, Gary. The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace (p. 21). Moody Publishers. Kindle Edition.

 


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